Arkansas Travelers: Hot Springs

LEAP likes to make the most of trips, so even on travel days, we want to see what we can see.  On the trip home from Little Rock, we stopped at Hot Springs, AR, where we visited the National Park, toured a bathhouse, drank spring water, and climbed a high tower!

To begin, we checked in at the National Park Visitor Center, where we bought a few items and then climbed the 216 Hot Springs Lookout Tower.  By “climbed,” I don’t mean on a ladder or anything, but we did climb stairs, the equivalent of about 15 flights.

In the tower are exhibits related to the Park and its history.

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And some wonderful views…

Following an overview of the Park, we visited some of the actual springs….

SHSU, LEAP Center, Center for Law Engagement And Politics, LEAP Ambassadors, Hot Springs AR, Hot Springs National Park

…where we took a series of photographs…

SHSU, LEAP Center, Center for Law Engagement And Politics, LEAP Ambassadors, Hot Springs AR, Hot Springs National Park

…and played in the water.

SHSU, LEAP Center, Center for Law Engagement And Politics, LEAP Ambassadors, Hot Springs AR, Hot Springs National Park

After playing in the water, we visited the bathhouses, where we learned about the spas role in the “medical field” in the days prior to antibiotics.  We saw cooling rooms…

SHSU, LEAP Center, Center for Law Engagement And Politics, LEAP Ambassadors, Hot Springs AR, Hot Springs National Park

…dressing rooms…

SHSU, LEAP Center, Center for Law Engagement And Politics, LEAP Ambassadors, Hot Springs AR, Hot Springs National Park

…and steam rooms….

SHSU, LEAP Center, Center for Law Engagement And Politics, LEAP Ambassadors, Hot Springs AR, Hot Springs National Park

…and an “infrastructure room,” where we could see the pipes and other parts of the system that made the bathhouses work.

SHSU, LEAP Center, Center for Law Engagement And Politics, LEAP Ambassadors, Hot Springs AR, Hot Springs National Park

Following the tour of the bathhouses, we slaked our thirst at the Superior Bathhouse Brewery.

SHSU, LEAP Center, Center for Law Engagement And Politics, LEAP Ambassadors, Hot Springs AR, Hot Springs National Park

It is the only brewery in a National Park, and they actually use spring water for their brew which, in our case, consisted of root beer.

SHSU, LEAP Center, Center for Law Engagement And Politics, LEAP Ambassadors, Hot Springs AR, Hot Springs National Park

For food, they had a diverse menu and a knowledgeable wait staff, and we were able to try various sandwiches, some beer cheese, and hummus.

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And with that tour of Hot Springs–yet another Arkansas town that is the home to Bill Clinton…

SHSU, LEAP Center, Center for Law Engagement And Politics, LEAP Ambassadors, Hot Springs AR, Hot Springs National Park

…we headed home.  It was a shortish trip by LEAP standards, but we managed to do a lot, see a lot, and learn a lot.

SHSU, LEAP Center, Center for Law Engagement And Politics, LEAP Ambassadors, Hot Springs AR, Hot Springs National Park

Author: mikeyawn

Mike Yawn teaches at Sam Houston State University. In the past few years, he has taught courses on Politics & Film, Public Policy, the Presidency, Media & Politics, Congress, Statistics, Research & Writing, Field Research, and Public Opinion. He has published academic papers in the Journal of Politics, Political Behavior, Social Security Quarterly, Film & History, American Politics Review, and contributed a chapter to the textbook Politics and Film. He also contributes columns, news analysis, and news stories to newspapers such as the Houston Chronicle, San Antonio Express News, Seattle Post-Intelligencer, Stamford Advocate, Greenwich Time, Huron Daily Tribune, Laredo Morning Times, Beaumont Enterprise, Connecticut Post, and Midland Reporter Telegram. Yawn is also active in his local community, serving on the board of directors of the local YMCA and Friends of the Wynne. Previously, he served on the Huntsville's Promise and Stan Musial World Series Boards of Directors. In 2007-2008, Yawn was one of eight scholars across the nation named as a Carnegie Civic Engagement Scholar by the Carnegie Foundation.

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